Three Kings

Three Kings

The story of a bright star and three kings in folklore indicate the birth of a god, king, or hero. In Egypt, the “three kings” in the belt of Orion point to Sirius the night before the annual birth of the sun Horus, marking Winter Solstice.

Spring Equinox

Spring Equinox

“Ostara” or the Spring Equinox is a divinity of the radiating dawn spreading good fortune. Maidens clothed in costume show themselves in the mountains, suggestive of ancient gods. Ostara is a time of balance, the longest day and the longest night. Marking the rebirth of nature and return of the God who joins the Maiden bringing new life and fertility to the coming growing season.

Summer Solstice

Summer Solstice

On the “Litha” or Midsummer a bonfire is built, sending evil spirits away from the land. The Litha ashes retain their fiery power and are used as a protective amulet and to feed bountiful life into crops.

Fall Equinox

Fall Equinox

“Mabon” or the Fall Equinox is time to honor the changing seasons. This is a time of gratitude, plenty, and sharing our abundance. The exact moment the balance of dark and light shifts, and the darkness begins to takeover.

Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice

Yule, or the Winter Solstice is the shortest day and the longest night, the darkness now turning into light and bringing forward the promise of life. We feast and spread generosity to celebrate the birth of the sun.

Mother Earth

Mother Earth

The Goddess “Gaia” or Mother Earth is our creative and nurturing aspects, one who embodies the bounty of the Earth. This personification of nature has deep roots. The first Greek God was the Goddess “Gaia”. From her womb all life sprang. Mother Earth is always working to maintain wholeness and balance.